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Monthly Archives: August 2012

ALICE BARON, Soprano, * ?, † ?;

French soprano. One of the very few French dramatic sopranos to pursue an international career abroad, Alice Baron made a distinguished career, first at the Paris Opera, then in America with Oscar Hammerstein, before to establish herself as a true Wagnerian singer during and after WWI. She was brought to the public attention, in provincial opera houses at first, before joining the Nizza Opera House in 1907. Nizza at that time, was one of the most important places in France, presenting, just as its rival Monte-Carlo, an impressive international season. Alice Baron made an impressive debut there as Brünhilde in Reyer’s opera Sigur for the opening of the 1907/1908 season, the end of her one-year contract matching with her Paris Opera début in August 1908. In the meantime, she appeared successfully in Nizza as Salomé in Massenet’s Herodiade, Leonore in Il Trovatore, Tosca, Rachel in La Juive, and as Eva for the local premiere of Die Meistersinger with Léon Rothier as Hans Sachs and Henri Albers as Beckmesser. Immediately after the Nizza performances, Alice Baron went to Paris for her debut scheduled on August 7 th , 1908, as Valentine in Les Huguenots. She remained attached at the Paris Opera for one season, singing Aïda and creating the part of the 3 rd Norn in the Götterdämmerung premiere, conducted by Messager, on October 23, 1908. She quickly realized that the severe competition between the reigning divas of the Paris Opera, and the supremacy of such artists like Bréval or Demougeot in her repertoire, would certainly jeopardize her career in this house. Therefore, she accepted an audition for Oscar Hammerstein, and like many other French singers, was hired for his next coming season at the Manhattan Opera. Hammerstein at that time, was looking for young singers all over Europe, for his “educational season”, a kind of pre-season at the Manhattan Opera, with popular prices. With Alice Baron, he also wanted to secure the repertoire of his star, Mary Garden, by taking a French soprano able to sing Garden’s repertoire, in case of emergency. Baron sailed to America in mid-August. She must have done a very impressive audition, since Hammerstein scheduled her American debut as Aïda, on August 31, 1909, with a cast including Berthe Soyer, Carasa and the baritone Pignarato, under the baton of Sturani. According to the New York Times, she sang “with feeling and taste”, and gave 6 more Aïda performances until the end of the season. Her repertoire during her first American season also included Charpentier’s Louise which she sang on September 24, (and with Garden’s agreement), Santuzza, Tosca with Carasa and Beck, and Giulietta in Les Contes D’Hoffmann, conducted by Nicosia. This first season was a great success for Alice Baron, who immediately re-signed for a second contract in 1909/1910, for which Hammerstein gave her not only Aïda and Trovatore performances, but also Chrysothemis in the first American premiere of Elektra, for which he had just got the exclusive rights. This time, she reached the United States in early November of 1909 in order to start the ten weeks of rehearsals scheduled for ELEKTRA. In the meantime, she gave performances in Philadelphia: on November 27 th , as Aïda, as Marguerite in Faust for Christmas Eve, and as Aïda again on January 1 st 1910. At the Manhattan Opera she made her come-back on January 15 as Santuzza, and gave a performance of Trovatore, on January 29 with Zerola and Sammarco. Preceded by much publicity, the Elektra premiere took place on February 1st , 1910 and got a tremendous success. The piece, performed in its French version with a all French cast included Devries, Huberdeau, Mariette Mazarin and Jeanne-Gerville Réache, and was conducted by the new musical director appointed by Hammerstein: Henriquez De La Fuente. Even if some of the critics who were of the opinion that had Elektra been sung in German, (instead of the translation by Henri Gauthier-Villars), and that had De La Fuente reading been more forceful, the opera would have gained, the performance was overpowering. Same reactions in Philadelphia when the piece was presented on February 2nd . The auditorium held an enormous audience, and even if the score shocked the critics, the public responded filling the house for the other two performances. At this stage, Alice Baron kept only Chrysothemis at her repertoire until the very end of the season in Boston on March 23rd, exception made for a single LOUISE performance which she sang on February 23 rd , Mary Garden being ill. Financial problems as well as a terrible competition with the Metropolitan Opera, did not permit Hammerstein to set up a new season, and Baron’s American career came to a end. She settled in Europe during WW-I especially in Italy, where she got very much in demand in the Wagnerian repertoire. She gave the first performance of TRISTAN at the Teatro Comunale in Treviso in October 1913 under the direction of Vittorio Gui, and sang the part again, a couple of weeks later in Trieste with a cast including Flora Perini, Ernesto Lavarello, Francesco Cigada, and conducted by Gino Marinuzzi. On March 13, 1914, she was in Parlermo where she sang the local premiere of PARSIFAL at the Teatro Massimo with Bindo Gasparini in the title part, under Marinuzzi’s baton. Alice Baron repeated her Isolde in the fall of 1915 in Trieste with Luisa Garibaldi, Francesco Viñas and Segura Tallien, as well as at the Liceo on November 30, 1915, with a similar cast conducted by Antonio Ribera. She appeared twice at La Scala, each times on occasions related with the political conflict: On December 1 st , 1917 she sang “La Marseillaise” for the closure of the Garibaldi exhibition, while allies soldiers sang patriotic hymns; and on December 13, 1918 for another Allies Benefit concert where she sang “L’Inno delle Sorelle latine” by Attal, with Bianca Serena. She sang regularly in Italy and Spain until the mid twenties, appearing at the Liceo in 1916 as Brünhilde in Siegfried, in December 1919 as Isolde, and in January 1920 as Brünhilde in Walküre performances, given in a French translation with Charles Rousselière and Marcel Journet.

as Norne with Charbonel and Caro-Lucas Paris 1908

as Chrysostemis “Elektra” Manhattan Opera House New York 01. Feb. 1910

 
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Posted by on August 10, 2012 in Sopranos

 

ANNA BAHR-MILDENBURG, Soprano, * 29 November 1872 Wien, † 27 August 1941 Waidhofen an der Ybbs (Niederösterreich);

She received her training in Vienna, as well as at August Iffert in Dresden. In 1899 she debuted at the Municipal Theatre of Koblenz and was then one for each season at the City Theater Plauen (1900-1901) and the Theater of Posen (Poznan, 1901-1902) involved. It has subsequently held appointments at the City Theater in Rostock (1902-1904), at the Municipal Theatre of Augsburg (1904-1905), at the Municipal Theatre of Mulhouse (Mulhouse / Alsace, 1906-1907) and at the Municipal Theatre of Halle / Saale (1907 – 1910), after which they occurred only tierend gas. It was a highly dramatic soprano, especially as an interpreter of Wagner-known. They performed at the Bayreuth Festival 1908-1912 and 1909-1912 as Helmwige than 3 Norn. Successful guest appearances have taken her to the opera houses of Cologne and Leipzig, at the Court Opera in Munich and Stuttgart, at the Municipal Theatre in Bremen and the German Theatre in Prague. In 1913 and 1914 she participated in the performances of the Ring at the Théâtre de la Monnaie in Brussels. She continued her guest performances to continue into the twenties and later also appeared frequently in Wagner concerts. At the same time, she worked as since the end of World War Educator. Among her notable stage roles included: the Leonore in “Fidelio,” Senta “in the” Flying Dutchman, Elisabeth in “Tannhauser,” Elsa “in” Lohengrin, Sieglinde as Brünnhilde in the Ring of the Nibelung, the role of Isolde in “Tristan” Martha in the “lowlands” of E. d’Albert and the Valentine in “Les Huguenots” by Meyerbeer. She was in her second marriage with conductor Erich band (1876-1945) married, from 1907 to 1922 as principal conductor at the opera in Stuttgart and it served as music director in Halle / Saale.

as Grimgerde Bayreuth 1911 (Collection G&K)

as Grimgerde Bayreuth 1911

as Grimgerde Bayreuth 1911 (Collection G&K)

as Senta

with Team Bayreuth 1911

with Team [close-up] Bayreuth 1912 (Collection G&K)

Portrait

Portrait (by courtesy of Hanny Kopetz)

 

 
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Posted by on August 10, 2012 in Sopranos

 

ANNA BAHR-MILDENBURG, Soprano, * 29 November 1872 Wien als Tochter des österreichischen Majors von Bellschau-Mildenburg, † 27 January 1947 Wien;

Her voice was discovered by the writer Julius Rosen, 1891 in Gorizia, to study with Rosa Papier-Paumgartner in Vienna. While still a student, the director of the Hamburg Opera Bernhard Pollini attention to her and engaged her for his theater, where she made her debut in 1895 as Brunnhilde in Richard Wagner’s “Valkyrie” under Gustav Mahler. With this great composer and conductor connected it remained as an artist as well as personally and closely followed him in 1898 at the Vienna Court Opera. She, soon as a great interpreter of Wagner, in 1897 she sang at Bayreuth Kundry, Ortrud, 1909 “in” Lohengrin. In 1898 she was appointed to the Vienna Court Opera, where she celebrated great triumphs, including 1904 in “Iphigenia in Aulis,” Gluck. She also worked there on 02 January 1908 in the world premiere of Goldmark’s “with The Winter’s Tale.” 1906 and 1910 guest appearances at Covent Garden Opera in London, including 1906 as Isolde and as Elisabeth in “Tannhauser” in 1910 as Clytemnestra in the premiere of “Elektra” by Richard Strauss. In 1913 she toured there again as Clytemnestra. At the Opera of Frankfurt as a guest Elektra, as Isolde and Ortrud as “in” Lohengrin. In 1911-1914 it was again as Kundry in “Parsifal” at the center of the Bayreuth Festival. In 1909 she married the writer Hermann Bahr (1863-1934). Until 1916 she was a celebrated member of the Vienna Opera, whose member she was again in the season 1919-1920 and toured there yet until 1930. Guest performances have taken her to the Court Opera in Munich (1910, 1919, 1927), at the city theater of Zurich (1917), at the Théâtre de la Monnaie in Brussels (1914), at the German Theatre in Prague (1904, 1909, 1911), at the Mannheim Court Theatre (1910), at the Municipal Theatre of Hamburg (1926 as Clytemnestra), at the Municipal Opera in Berlin (1927 again as Clytemnestra). From her repertoire for the operatic stage or the Donna Anna are in “Don Giovanni,” Leonore in “Fidelio,” which Rezia in “Oberon,” Weber, Senta “in the” Flying Dutchman, the Venus in “Tannhauser,” Norma that Aida and Salome in the eponymous opera by Richard Strauss malice. Also in the concert hall it was a very successful career, in 1901, she sang in Munich in the world premiere of “The plaintive song,” by Gustav Mahler. In 1921 she became a professor at the Academy of Music in Munich, since 1922 at the same time facilitator at the Munich State Opera. In 1921-1926 stage director at the Municipal Theatre in Augsburg, where they would often directed. In 1931 she sang as the last game at the Opera Festival of the Augsburg Clytemnestra. In 1923 and 1925 she participated in the festivals of Salzburg as an actress in Calderón’s “world theater”. She wrote memoirs (Vienna, 1921) and, together with Hermann Bahr, “Bayreuth and the Wagner Theatre” (1910). – One of the most dramatic and above all, Wagner sopranos of her time, next to the beauty of her voice with an outstanding drama. As an internationally renowned educator, she was like this major singers such as Elisabeth Schärtel, Nezadal Maria Eugenia Zareska, Ruth Michaelis, Ira Malaniuk, Adolf Vogel, Josef Greindl and the famous Wagnerian tenor Lauritz Melchior.
From her voice, there is a single shot, the recitative-aria of the ocean from the “Oberon” Weber on G & T (Vienna, 1905).

Lit: “Memories” (Vienna, 1921); P. Stefan: Anna Bahr-Mildenburg (Vienna, 1922).

as Isolde (Collection G&K)

as Isolde Wien 1903 (by courtesy of Peter Giljum)

as Isolde Wien 1903 (Collection G&K)

as Isolde Wien 1903 (Collection G&K)

as Isolde Wien 1903 (by courtesy of Peter Giljum)

as Isolde Wien 1903 (by courtesy of Peter Giljum)

as Isolde Wien 1898 (by courtesy of Peter Giljum)

as Isolde Wien 1898 (by courtesy of Peter Giljum)

as Brünnhilde Wien

as Brünnhilde “Walküren”Wien 1898 (by courtesy of Peter Giljum)

as Brünnhilde Wien

as Brünnhilde Wien

as Brünnhilde “Götterd.”

as Kundry Bayreuth 1897

as Kundry Bayreuth 1911

as Kundry Wien 1914 (by Peter Giljum)

as Kundry with Kirchhoff Bayreuth 1914 (Collection G&K)

as Kundry Bayreuth 1897 (by Peter Giljum)

as Kundry Bayreuth 1897 (by Peter Giljum)

as Kundry Bayreuth 1911

as Kundry Bayreuth 1911

as Elisabeth

as Ortrud (Collection G&K)

as Ortrud

as Ortrud (Collection G&K)

as Ortrud Bayreuth

as Ortrud Bayreuth

as Fidelio Wien (by courtesy of Peter Giljum)

as Amneris Wien

as Queen of Saba Wien (by courtesy of Peter Giljum)

as Martha (by courtesy of Peter Giljum)

as Klytäm- nestra Wien 1909 (by courtesy of Peter Giljum)

as Carmen Wien (by courtesy of Peter Giljum)

as “Frau Welt” with ? [Theatre] Salzburg 1925 (by courtesy of Peter Giljum)

with Jurinac Masterclass Mozarteum Salzburg 1943

Masterclass Mozarteum Salzburg 1943 (Collection G&K)

with her husband Hermann Bahr Bayreuth 1914 (by courtesy of Peter Giljum)

Portrait

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Portrait

 
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Posted by on August 10, 2012 in Sopranos

 

FLORENCE AUSTRAL, Soprano, * 26 April 1892 Richmond bei Melbourne (Australien), † 18 May 1968 Newcastle bei Sydney;

Her real name was Mary Wilson. Her father, William Lindholm, was an immigrant from Scandinavia to Australia and had thereby assumed the surname of Wilson. He died early, led to his daughter the surname of her stepfather and was named Florence Fawaz. She studied at the Conservatory of Melbourne at Madame Elise Wiedermann, then since 1918 in New York at Gabriele Sibella, finally, at the Royal School of Opera in London. They first gave concerts in Chicago and Boston. In 1920 she refused an offer from the New York Metropolitan Opera. In 1921 they hired for the upcoming season at the Covent Garden Opera House, but did not come this season. The conductor Percy Pitt, it undertook to 1922 for the British National Opera Company, where she made her debut under the name of Florence Wilson in May 1922 as Brünnhilde in “Die Walküre”. At the same society as Isolde and then they had great success as Aida. It was (now under the stage name Florence Austral) celebrated the first Wagner opera soprano in London’s Covent Garden. 1923 and 1926 she was admired as a concert singer at the London Handel festival in 1924 at the Wembley Exposition in Beethoven’s 9th Symphony, in London’s Crystal Palace in the Verdi Requiem. In 1925 she embarked on an extensive concert tour of the USA, the same year she married the Australian flautist John Amadio. By 1935 they repeated their annual U.S. tour, 1930, she traveled through Australia. In 1934-1935 she appeared there in a guest performance tour in her Wagner roles, as a Marschallin in “Der Rosenkavalier” and, most surprisingly, in the coloratura role of Leila in “Pêcheurs de perles” by Bizet. In 1927 she sang Brünnhilde in New York in a concert performance of “Gotterdammerung” and the soprano solo in the B Minor Mass by JS Bach. 1928 at the Philadelphia Opera as Brünnhilde in the Ring cycle as a guest (with George Baklanoff as partner). In 1930 performances in Berlin, she was also in Hamburg and San Francisco to meet as a guest. Concert tours in England, America, Holland, South Africa and Australia. Focus of their work remained the Covent Garden Opera, where she sang until 1940. In 1937-1939 she appeared as guest on the Sadler’s Wells Opera in London. In 1937 she sang the last time in the United States in concert with the Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra under Eugene Ormandy. During World War II, she lived in England and there were charity concerts. In 1946 she returned to her Australian homeland and took up a teaching position at the Conservatory of Newcastle near Sydney. In 1959 she had to give up because of this, however, a progressive rheumatic disease. She lived most recently almost completely paralyzed, in Newcastle. – One of the greatest dramatic sopranos of her generation, and Wagner, where she presented the major Wagner roles in a way that ultimately had their basis in the classical art of bel canto.
Records in both acoustic and electrical recording techniques also exclusively on HMV.
LIT: J. Moffat. Florence Austral (Sydney, 1996) D. White: Florence Austral (in “Record Collector”, 1961-1962). M. Elphinstone & W. Hancock: “When Austral Sang – The Biography of Florence Austral,” Richmond, 2005.

as Isolde

as Brünnhilde Debut Covent Garden London Mai 1922 (by courtesy of Michael Elphistone)

as Brünnhilde

as Brünnhilde

as Brünnhilde

as Senta

as Tosca

as Tosca 1924

as Aida Covent Garden London 1934

as Marschallin

with Amadio 1931

with Amadio

Portrait 1919 (by courtesy of Michael Elphistone)

Portrait 1928 (by courtesy of William Hogarth)

Portrait

Portrait

Portrait 1930 (by courtesy of Michael Elphistone)

Portrait

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Portrait ca. 1930

Portrait

Portrait (by courtesy of Michael Elphistone)

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Portrait London ca. 1925 (by courtesy of William Hogarth)

Portrait

Portrait Return to Australia Melbourne 1946

at the Central Station Sydney 1934

at home

by cooking

by knitting (by courtesy of Devoe Coll.)

Portrait (Painting)

Portrait Adelaide Jul. 1946

PortraitSydney 22. Sep. 1948

75 birthday26. Apr. 1962

Biography by M. Elphinstone & W. Hancock

For more information about FLORENCE AUSTRAL please visit:

http://whenaustralsang.tripod.com/

 

 
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Posted by on August 9, 2012 in Sopranos

 

MELITTA AMERLING, Alto/Soprano, * 12 January 1898 Wien, † ?;

Her training took place at Agnes Cancels-Pyllemann in Vienna, and she made her debut in 1922 at the Municipal Theatre of Gablonz (Jablonec), to which she belonged until 1924. In season 1924-25 she was at the Vienna Volksoper, 1925-28 at the City Theater Chemnitz and 1928-31 involved at the State Theatre of Braunschweig. 1931-35 she worked at the Metropolitan Opera in Berlin and then sang at the Dortmund Municipal Theatre (1935-1936), at the Municipal Theater Duisburg (1936-1937) and at the City Theater in Essen (1937-1938). She appeared only tierend gas, but now as a soprano on. While they are “in the first part of her career as a contralto roles such as Azucena in” Il Trovatore, Emilia in Verdi’s “Othello,” the Lucia in “Cavalleria Rusticana,” the Erda in the Ring of the Nibelung, the Brangaene in “Tristan,” Herodias in “Salome “by Richard Strauss and the Countess in” The soldiers’ took over from Gurlitt, she sang as a soprano, Venus in “Tannhauser,” Ortrud in “Lohengrin,” Kundry in “Parsifal”, the Brünnhilde in the ring of the Nibelung, Isolde “in” Tristan, “the title characters in” Mona Lisa “by M. von Schillings and” Ariadne auf Naxos “by Richard Strauss as the Marschallin in” Der Rosenkavalier. Guest performances brought her to the State Opera of Dresden (1927) and Vienna (1938) and at the Bayreuth Festival (1933-1934  as Gerhilde and when the 2nd or 3rd Norn in “Götterdämmerung”) success. She was married in second marriage with the bass-baritone Hermann Reichert (1892-1957).

as Brünnhilde

as Brünnhilde

as Dalila Berlin 1932 (By courtesy of Manfred Krugmann)

with Bayreuth- Team (close up) Bayreuth 1933 (collection G&K)

Portrait

Portrait

 
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Posted by on August 9, 2012 in Sopranos

 

TERESA ARKEL, Soprano, * 1861 Lemberg (Lwów), † July 1929 Mailand.

She studied at the Conservatory of Lemberg, then in Vienna with Luise Dustmann. 1883 she made her debut as a concert singer in Lviv. There, in 1884 and made her stage debut, “as Valentine in Meyerbeer’s” Huguenots. In 1885 she toured very successfully at the Warsaw Opera as Aida, as Selika “in Meyerbeer’s” Africaine “and as Leonora in” Il Trovatore. After she was in season 1885-86 occurred again at the Opera of Lviv, they moved their business to Western Europe. 1886 she appeared in Vienna and in Paris, in the 1886-87 season she was engaged at the National Theatre of Prague, 1887-90 at the Municipal Theatre (Opera House) from Hamburg. Since then she has given performances at international level. They toured in 1888 in Budapest, 1889 in Milan, 1890 in Madrid and Bilbao, 1891 in Odessa, 1892 in Barcelona, ​​1893 and 1896 in Lisbon, 1894 and 1896, again in Madrid in 1894 at the Teatro de l’Opera in Buenos Aires (as Desdemona in Verdi’s “Othello” and as Elsa in “Lohengrin”). 1898 she was heard again at the Opera of Lviv, 1899 at the Grand Opera of Warsaw. In Madrid, where she was very popular, she sang e.g. in the world premiere of the opera “Juana la Loca” by Emilio Serrao. In 1891 she came to La Scala (Appointed Role: Venus in “Tannhauser,” as a partner of Hariclea Darclée). In 1892 she sang Norma there and Desdemona in “Othello”. In 1897 she appeared at La Scala with the premiere of the opera “Signor de Pourceaugnac” by Alberto Franchetti, a partner of Alessandro Bonci. In 1900 she sang at the Teatro Carlo Felice “in Genoa, the Brünnhilde in” Götterdämmerung, the same year she left the stage in Madrid. Their major roles in the field of opera, were found mainly in the second Abaschnitt her career, in Wagner’s operas (Isolde, Brünnhilde, Senta, Elsa, Sieglinde, Elisabeth in “Tannhauser”), but also as Halka by Moniuszko and as Amelia in Verdi’s “Ballo in Maschera,” it was successful. In 1900 she opened a singing school in Milan, which earned a great reputation. Among her students were so important singers such as Claire Dux, Lucette Korsoff, Eugenia and Irene Bronskaja Eden.
Rare recordings of G & T Company (Milan, 1903-05) and Fonotipia (Milan, 1905).

as ? Barcelona

Portrait

Portrait

 
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Posted by on August 9, 2012 in Sopranos

 

JOHANNA ANDRÉ, Soprano, * 30 June 1859 Doberan in Mecklenburg, † 23 June 1926 Braunschweig;

Her father, Anton André, worked as an opera singer at the Court Theater of Schwerin. She was trained by Mrs. Hesse-sureties in Berlin and made ​​his debut there, “also in 1875 at the Kroll Opera House as Annie in” Freischütz. 1875-76 she sang at the court theater of Darmstadt, 1876-1877 at the Municipal Theatre of Bremen. Franz Abt, then Kapellmeister at Brunswick court theater committed, the young singer 1877 for this house, where she remained until her resignation since the stage 1906th She was considered excellent and above all a dramatic Wagnerian soprano. So she was to attend the premiere of “Parsifal” on 26 July 1882 invited at the Bayreuth Festival and sang one of the flower girl (also in performances from 1883 and 1984). Their great stage roles, which they in Brunswick as well as for guest appearances, etc. at the court theaters of Hanover and Kassel, in the opera houses of Frankfurt and Leipzig, lectured, were the Senta in “The Flying Dutchman,” Isolde in “Tristan,” the Brünnhilde in the Ring of the Nibelung, the Agathe in “Der Freischütz” and Pamina in the “Magic Flute,” Leonore in “Fidelio” and the Donna Anna in “Don Giovanni”. In 1887 she worked in Brunswick in the world premiere of the opera “with The Wild Hunter” from August Schulz. The renowned artist was as a concert singer in Brunswick later in the educational sector.

as Isolde

as flower- maiden with WinkelmannBayreuth 1882

 

 

 
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Posted by on August 9, 2012 in Sopranos

 

EMMA ALBANI, Soprano, * 1 November 1847 Chambly bei Montreal (Kanada), † 3 April 1930 Kensington bei London;


Her real name was Marie Louise Cecilia Emma Lajeunesse . She sang with eight years in a concert opera arias accompanied himself on piano. When she was 14 years old, her parents moved to Albany, New York. (From the name of the city she made her stage name Albani). There she sang in a Catholic church solo parts, and served as choir director and organist. The Bishop of the Diocese advised to study singing in Europe, and she became a student of Louis Gilbert Duprez in Paris, then by Francesco Lamperti in Milan. Debut in 1870 at the Opera House of Messina as Amina in “La Sonnambula”. After stints in Florence and Malta in 1872 sensational success at Covent Garden Opera, again as Amina. 1872-1873 at the Italian Opera in Paris, 1874, the Court Opera in St. Petersburg and Moscow, celebrated in October 1874, the Academy of Music in New York (inaugural role of Amina in “La Sonnambula” by Bellini), 1877 in Berlin ( Elsa in “Lohengrin” and Senta in “The Flying Dutchman” in German), 1878, again in Paris, Brussels and in 1880 (without much success) at La Scala as Lucia di Lammermoor and Gilda. 1881, 1886 and 1888 she was heard as guest at the Berlin Court Opera, 1882 at the Opera of Monte Carlo (such as Ophelie in “Hamlet” by A. Thomas and Gilda). In 1878 she married Ernest Gye, the son of the impresario of Covent Garden Opera Frederick Gye, who led the house 1849-1877, and was residing in London. Here they had for many years triumphant success at Covent Garden Opera (1872-1896), but mainly as a concert singer. She created for the Covent Garden Opera in London, a variety of roles: in 1874 the title character in “Mignon” by Thomas, 1875, “Elsa in” Lohengrin, 1876 Elisabeth in “Tannhauser,” 1877 Senta in “The Flying Dutchman” (still in Italian), 1881, Tamara, “in Rubinstein’s” Demon, 1891 as Desdemona in “Othello” by Verdi, 1884 Brunehild in “Sigurd,” by Reyer. In 1895 she was involved with this house in the world premiere of “Harold” by Frederick Cowen. The artist was one of the favorite singers of Queen Victoria. In 1891-1892 engaged at the Metropolitan Opera in New York. Here she sang the role of Gilda in 1891 as the debut “in” Rigoletto. In 1883 they had made a great guest performance and concert tour in the U.S. was in 1890 as a member of a traveling opera company under the impresario Abbey in the house of the Metropolitan encountered opera and had the Desdemona as a partner of the famous Italian heroic tenor Francesco Tamagno (the Othello of sung world premiere). In 1892 she sang this part, one of her best roles, then the official premiere of the opera at the Metropolitan Opera, now with the great tenor Jean de Reszke. From her stage roles nor the Countess were “in” Nozze di Figaro, Martha by Flotow, Eve “in the” Meistersinger, as Desdemona in Rossini’s opera “Otello,” which Linda di Chamounix by Donizetti, Elvira in “I Puritani” Bellini, the Leonora in “Il Trovatore”, La Traviata, the Isabella in “Le Pré aux Clerks” by Hérold, Marguerite de Valois, as Valentine in “Les Huguenots” by Meyerbeer, the Marguerite in “Faust” by Gounod, the Juliette in “Roméo et Juliette” by the same composer and Antonida called in “A Life for the Tsar” by M. Glinka. In 1894-1895 she undertook an extensive and highly successful concert and guest-tour through Germany and Switzerland, where she was mainly in Frankfurt and Basel great success. She had even a brilliant career as a concert and especially as an oratorio singer: so she created in 1882 in Birmingham »festival oratorio Rédemption” by Gounod, then for them “Mors et Vita,” wrote a work that in 1885 when too Festival Birmingham brought to the premiere. 1886 she sang in London in the presence of Franz Liszt’s oratorio St. in from “the legend. Elizabeth, “1888, she gave concerts in Copenhagen. In 1898 she was on tour in Canada, with additional concert tours in 1898 Auustralien and New Zealand, 1898-99 and 1904 in South Africa, India and Ceylon in 1907 in the usual success. In 1896 she left the stage after being in London again as Isolde in “Tristan” had won a grand success in 1911 and the concert stage with a final concert performance at London’s Albert Hall. She then worked as a teacher in London. In 1925 she received the title of Dame of the British Empire. She wrote her autobiography under the title Memoirs of Emma Albani, Forty Years of Song (London, 1911). Her voice was even formed entirely by the classical bel canto and fullness of tone and richness of expression combined with an unusual mastery of vocal technique.

Four extremely rare title on G & T (London, 1904) and three-Pathé plates (London, 1904) can hardly provide a valid idea of ​​the voice of the singer.

Lit: Macdonald, “Emma Albani. Victorian Diva “(Toronto, 1985) and H. Charbonneau. L’Albani (Montreal, 193ß), NA Ridley & W.R. Moran: Emma Albani (in “Record Collector”, 1958).

 as Isolde
 as Elsa Met 1891
as Elsa Met 1891
as Elsa Met 1891
as Elsa
as ElisabethMet 1879
as Desdemona1890
as Desdemona1890
as Desdemona1890
as Desdemona1890
as Eva
 as Violetta “La Traviata”
as Lucia London
as Sita “Roi de Lahore”
as Sita “Roi de Lahore”
as Marguerite “Faust”
Portrait
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Portrait(Collection G&K)
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 Portrait Engraving (Collection G&K)
 
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Posted by on August 9, 2012 in Sopranos

 

ADA ADINI, Soprano, * 1855 Boston, † February 1924 Dieppe (Departement Seine-Inférieure, Frankreich);

Adele Chapman was her real name .She was formed by Pauline Viardot-Garcia and Giovanni Sbriglia in Paris. In 1876 they debuted at the Municipal Theatre of Varese in the title role of Opera “Dinorah” by Meyerbeer. She married the Spanish tenor Antonio Aramburo (1840-1912), with whom she sang in 1879 at the Mapleson Opera Company in New York. With this opera company, it was 1879 at the “New York Academy of Music as Gilda in” Rigoletto, then “as Leonora in” Il Trovatore on. In 1882 she toured with the troupe in Berlin Merelli, 1883 in Prague since 1887, there were frequent appearances at the Grand Opéra Paris (inaugural role Chimène in “Le Cid” by Massenet). She sang in the years to 1891, including the Selika in “L’Africaine” by Meyerbeer, the Donna Anna in “Don Giovanni” that Rachel in “La Juive” by Halévy, the Valentine in “Les Huguenots” by Meyerbeer, the Empress Elizabeth in “Henry VIII” by St -Saëns and the Brunehild in “Sigurd,” by Reyer, on 21 March 1890, she sang at the Grand Opera in the premiere of the opera “Ascanio” by Saint-Saens, the role of the Duchesse d’Etampes. In 1893 she took over at Milan’s La Scala in the local premiere of “Valkyrie,” the role of Brünnhilde. In the years 1894-1897, they had great success at Covent Garden Opera, she made guest appearances at the Teatro San Carlo in Naples (1894, in “I Medici” by Leoncavallo), the opera house in Zagreb (1896), at the Teatro Costanzi in Rome (1899 as Brünnhilde in “Die Walküre”), in Madrid and Barcelona, ​​Amsterdam and South America. In Bologna, she was heard as Brünnhilde in the Ring of the Nibelung and as Isolde in “Tristan”. In season 1894-1895 she appeared at La Scala in the operas “Sigurd,” to “Patrie!” Of Paladilhe, “La Navarraise” and “Le Cid” by Massenet, and all performances were held in Italian. At the Monte Carlo Opera, she sang in 1896 Fredegonde the premiere of the opera “Ghiselle” by Cesar Franck. In 1896 she joined the expiration of a great guest performance with concerts in Leipzig, Schwerin, and at the Vienna Court Opera. In 1897-1898 they undertook a further guest tour through Germany and Russia, where she appeared as a Wagnerian singer, especially in appearance. 1902-03 it was again heard at the Grand Opera. As a concert soloist, she came to an international career, she later worked as a teacher, one of her pupils was the Spanish mezzo-soprano Maria Gay. In her second marriage she had with the writer Paul Millet († 1912), married, who wrote several librettos for operas by Massenet. – With its rich, expressive voice, she mastered a huge role repertoire ranged from coloratura role to Wagner heroine; to their celebrated roles, the Desdemona heard in Verdi’s “Othello,” the Venus in “Tannhauser,” and Charlotte in “Werther” by Massenet.
Five very rare recordings on the brand Fonotipia (Paris, 1905).

as Brünnhilde

as Brünnhilde

as Brünnhilde
as Brünnhilde
as Duchaise D’Estampes “Ascanio” Saint-Saens
as Duchaise D’Estampes “Ascanio” Saint-Saens
Portrait
Portrait
Portrait
 
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Posted by on August 9, 2012 in Sopranos

 

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Posted by on August 8, 2012 in Uncategorized

 
 
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